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An Insertion Position Illuminated Needle Guide Template for Transperineal Prostate Interventions

Institution:
Surgical Planning Laboratory, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School Boston, MA, USA.
Publication Date:
Jun-2014
Citation:
The 28th Int Congress and Exhibition on Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery (CARS), 2014 June, Fukuoka, Japan.
Keywords:
Flexible manipulator, Four-wire-driven, Medical robot, Quad-directional structure, Robotic catheter, Robotic surgery
Appears in Collections:
CARS
Sponsors:
P41 EB015898/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/United States
Generated Citation:
Yoshimitsu K., Song S-E., Tokuda J., Hata N. An Insertion Position Illuminated Needle Guide Template for Transperineal Prostate Interventions. The 28th Int Congress and Exhibition on Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery (CARS), 2014 June, Fukuoka, Japan.
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Purpose: Robotic catheters have been proposed to increase the efficacy and safety of the radio-frequency ablation treat- ment. The robotized motion of current robotic catheters mim- ics the motion of manual ones - namely, deflection in one direction and rotation around the catheter. With the expecta- tion that the higher dexterity may achieve further efficacy and safety of the robotically driven treatment, we prototyped a four-wire-driven robotic catheter with the ability to deflect in two-degree-of-freedom motions in addition to rotation. Methods: A novel quad-directional structure with two wires was designed and developed to attain yaw and pitch motion in the robotic catheter. We performed a mechanical evalu- ation of the bendability and maneuverability of the robotic catheter and compared it with current manual catheters. Results We found that the four-wire-driven robotic catheter can achieve a pitching angle of 184.7◦ at a pulling distance of wire for 11 mm, while the yawing angle was 170.4◦ at 11 mm. The robotic catheter could attain the simultaneous two-degree-of-freedom motions in a simulated cardiac chamber. Conclusion: The results indicate that the four-wire-driven robotic catheter may offer physicians the opportunity to intuitively control a catheter and smoothly approach the focus position that they aim to ablate.

Additional Material
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Yoshimitsu-CARS2014-fig4.jpg (106.378kB)