Surgical Planning Laboratory - Brigham & Women's Hospital - Boston, Massachusetts USA - a teaching affiliate of Harvard Medical School

Surgical Planning Laboratory

The Abstract Database hosted by SPL

All Abstracts | Upload | Advanced Search | Gallery View | Download Statistics | Help | Import | Log in

Bi-exponential Diffusion Analysis in Normal Prostate and Prostate Cancer: Transition Zone and Peripheral Zone Considerations

Institution:
1Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
2Department of Radiology, Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
Publication Date:
May-2015
Citation:
The International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 23rd Scientific Meeting & Exhibition, 2015 May, Toronto, Canada. P2489.
Appears in Collections:
ISMRM
Sponsors:
R01 CA160902/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
R01 EB010195/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/United States
P41 EB015898/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/United States
U24 CA180918/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
Generated Citation:
Kobus T., Fedorov A., Tempany C.M., Mulkern R.V., Dunne R., Maier S.E. Bi-exponential Diffusion Analysis in Normal Prostate and Prostate Cancer: Transition Zone and Peripheral Zone Considerations. The International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 23rd Scientific Meeting & Exhibition, 2015 May, Toronto, Canada. P2489.
Export citation:
Google Scholar: link

Prostate diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is typically performed using a small number of b-values under 1400 s/mm2 with apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) calculated assuming mono-exponential decays. Over an extended range of b-values, bi-exponential fits better characterize the signal decay and offer additional tissue characterization. Especially for b-factors > 2000 s/mm2, the bi-exponential model has more information content than mono-exponential or kurtosis models1. Cancer detection in the transition zone (TZ) of the prostate remains challenging. Promising results have been published using the parameters obtained from biexponential fits to differentiate TZ tumors from normal tissue2. Here, we assess tumors originating from the peripheral zone (PZ) and TZ separately and evaluate the performance of the bi-exponential model to differentiate these tumors from normal tissue.