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Accelerated Segmented Diffusion-Weighted Prostate Imaging for Higher Resolution, Better Geometric Fidelity, and Multi-b Perfusion Quantification

Institution:
Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
Publication Date:
May-2016
Volume Number:
P5149.
Citation:
The International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 24th Scientific Meeting & Exhibition, 2016 May, Singapore. P5149.
Appears in Collections:
ISMRM
Sponsors:
R01 CA160902/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
R01 EB010195/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/United States
R25 CA089017/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
P41 EB015898/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/United States
R01 CA149342/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
Generated Citation:
Aksit Ciris P., Chiou J-Y.G., Fedorov A., Tempany-Afdhal C.M., Madore B., Maier S.E. Accelerated Segmented Diffusion-Weighted Prostate Imaging for Higher Resolution, Better Geometric Fidelity, and Multi-b Perfusion Quantification. The International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 24th Scientific Meeting & Exhibition, 2016 May, Singapore. P5149.
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An accelerated multi-shot diffusion imaging sequence and reconstruction scheme was developed for prostate imaging, allowing improvements in spatial resolution, geometric-fidelity and b-factor coverage to be achieved within a short scan time. Two-fold improvement in spatial resolution and three-fold improvement in geometric fidelity were obtained as compared to single-shot EPI, in twelve prostate cancer patients. In contrast to the standard protocol, which involves separate scans with high (b=1400 and 0 s/mm2) and intermediate (b=500 and 0 s/mm2) diffusion weighting, the proposed accelerated protocol yielded an additional 8 b-factors in half the scan time (5 min 43 s vs. 11 min 48 s).