NAC Neuroimage Analysis Center

Service and training

Introduction

The NAC provides different services. The primary application of the grant is the application of algorithms. In addition, we make available software and datasets, including the following resources:

  1. 3D visualization package called the 3D Slicer
  2. 3D Anatomical Atlas and specialized viewing tools
  3. Visualization Tool SPLViz for the visualization of Medical Image Data

We also provide on-site training for self-funded scientists on a one-to one basis.

Slicer

The 3D Slicer is a workstation-based volume editor and generic visualization tool for medical imaging. This software package is available for use by other developers, collaborators, and researchers. Its applications include: click here for full picture and text

Its functionality includes: click for full picture and text

For additional information regarding the applications and functionality of the 3D Slicer, see Visualization.

The 3D Slicer is more accessible than ever before. The Slicer is one of several programs made available to collaborators on a source code server built with CVS-an open-source version control program-via secure FTP. In addition, we have simplified our licensing requirements in an effort to allow more researchers to use, develop, and extend this tool.

To obtain a copy, you need to read and agree with The terms for the use of the 3D Slicer which explains that this software is made available for scientific research purposes only, and then complete the following form. If you indicate you agree with the 3D Slicer Software Licence Agreement, we will send you an email explaining how to access the software. The 3D Slicer has over 6000 registered users worldwide, and is available in Solaris, Linux and Windows formats.

Please check out the Slicer Web Site at http://www.slicer.org.

Anatomical atlas

The results of our work in the Clinical Computational Anatomy Core are made available for research, development, and/or educational purposes. The Atlas is in use at over 1000 registered sites worldwide.

If you're interested in the technology behind the Anatomy Browser, source code for the application is freely available and provided as open source software for non-commercial purposes. To obtain a copy, you need to read and agree with the Terms for use of the 3D Anatomical Atlas, which explains that this software is made available for scientific research purposes only, and then complete the following form. If you indicate you agree with the "Terms for use of the 3D Anatomical Atlas", we will send you an email explaining how to access the viewer programs and the data sets.

For more information, please visit the Atlas home page.

Visualization Tool SPLViz

SPLViz is written in Java and Java3D and allows the visualization of a combination of cross-sectional data and 3D surface models. Cross-sections can be displayed on sample planes of arbitrary orientation. SPLViz was developed as a "lightweight" viewing tool for scenes developed with the 3D Slicer program. SPLViz reads 3D surface models stored in the .vtk format and cross-sectional data using the DICOM format (and a few other formats). For multi-modality data, SPLViz relies on the .mrml format, implemented in XML. This format was developed for the 3D Slicer program.

To apply for access to this tool, you need to read and agree with the Terms for use of the Visualization Tool SPLViz, which explains that this tool is made available for scientific research purposes only, and then complete the following form. If you complete the form and indicate you agree with the Terms of Use, we will review your application and, if approved, send you an email explaining how to access the SPLViz. The software has over 300 registered users worldwide.

Training

Each year, researchers come to us for training in the Core technologies. Trainees have included medical and engineering undergraduates and postgraduates, software developers, and those developing applications based on software developed by the NAC. We have been fortunate to work with over 500 trainees so far. For the most recent reporting period (May 2004-April 2005), the breakdown was as follows:

161
Medical   Engineering 
Postgraduate
51
63
Undergraduate 
36
11

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