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Stochastic Tractography Study of Inferior Frontal Gyrus Anatomical Connectivity in Schizophrenia

Institution:
1Psychiatry Neuroimaging Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
2Clinical Neuroscience Division, Laboratory of Neuroscience, Boston VA Healthcare System-Brockton Division, Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Brockton, MA, USA.
3Laboratory of Mathematics Imaging, MRI Division, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
4Departments of Radiology and Psychiatry, Center for Neurological Imaging, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
5Surgical Planning Laboratory, MRI Division, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
Publication Date:
Apr-2011
Journal:
Neuroimage
Volume Number:
55
Issue Number:
4
Pages:
1657-64
Citation:
Neuroimage. 2011 Apr 15;55(4):1657-64.
PubMed ID:
21256966
PMCID:
PMC3073419
Keywords:
Diffusion Tensor Imaging, Schizophrenia, Stochastic Tractography, Language Network, Inferior frontal gyrus, Fractional Anisotropy (FA)
Appears in Collections:
PNL, LMI, NA-MIC, NAC, SLICER, SPL
Sponsors:
K05 MH070047/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/United States
K23 MH073416/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/United States
P30 AG013846/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
P41 RR013218/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/United States
P50 MH080272/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/United States
R01 MH082918/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/United States
R01 MH040799/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/United States
R01 MH050740/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/United States
R01 MH074794/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/United States
U54 EB005149/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/United States
Generated Citation:
Kubicki M., Alvarado J.L., Westin C-F., Tate D.F., Markant D., Terry D.P., Whitford T.J., De Siebenthal J., Bouix S., McCarley R.W., Kikinis R., Shenton M.E. Stochastic Tractography Study of Inferior Frontal Gyrus Anatomical Connectivity in Schizophrenia. Neuroimage. 2011 Apr 15;55(4):1657-64. PMID: 21256966. PMCID: PMC3073419.
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BACKGROUND: Abnormalities within language-related anatomical structures have been associated with clinical symptoms and with language and memory deficits in schizophrenia. Recent studies suggest disruptions in functional connectivity within the Inferior Frontal Gyrus (IFG) network in schizophrenia. However, due to technical challenges, anatomical connectivity abnormalities within this network and their involvement in clinical and cognitive deficits have not been studied. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Diffusion and anatomical scans were obtained from 23 chronic schizophrenia patients and 23 matched controls. The IFG was automatically segmented, and its white matter connections extracted and measured with newly-developed stochastic tractography tools. Correlations between anatomical structures and measures of semantic processing were also performed. RESULTS: White Matter connections between the IFG and posterior brain regions followed two distinct pathways: dorsal and ventral. Both demonstrated left lateralization, but ventral pathway abnormalities were only found in schizophrenia. IFG volumes also showed left lateralization and abnormalities in schizophrenia. Further, despite similar laterality and abnormality patterns, IFG volumes and white matter connectivity were not correlated with each other in either group. Interestingly, measures of semantic processing correlated with white matter connectivity in schizophrenia and with gray matter volumes in controls. Finally, hallucinations were best predicted by both gray matter and white matter measures together. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest abnormalities within the ventral IFG network in schizophrenia, with white matter abnormalities better predicting semantic deficits. The lack of a statistical relationship between coexisting gray and white matter deficits might suggest their different origin and the necessity for a multimodal approach in future schizophrenia studies.

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