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Structural and Connectomic Neuroimaging for the Personalized Study of Longitudinal Alterations in Cortical Shape, Thickness and Connectivity after Traumatic Brain Injury

Institution:
Institute for Neuroimaging and Informatics, Department of Neurology, Keck School of Medicine,University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA. jvanhorn@usc.edu.
Publisher:
Minerva Medica
Publication Date:
Sep-2014
Journal:
J Neurosurg Sci
Volume Number:
58
Issue Number:
3
Pages:
129-44
Citation:
J Neurosurg Sci. 2014 Sep;58(3):129-44.
PubMed ID:
24844173
PMCID:
PMC4158854
Keywords:
traumatic brain injury, neuroimaging, magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, connectomics
Appears in Collections:
NA-MIC, SLICER
Sponsors:
U54 EB005149/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/United States
P01 NS058489/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/United States
R41 NS081792/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/United States
Generated Citation:
Irimia A., Goh S.Y.M., Torgerson C.M., Vespa P.M., Van Horn J.D. Structural and Connectomic Neuroimaging for the Personalized Study of Longitudinal Alterations in Cortical Shape, Thickness and Connectivity after Traumatic Brain Injury. J Neurosurg Sci. 2014 Sep;58(3):129-44. PMID: 24844173. PMCID: PMC4158854.
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The integration of longitudinal brain structure analysis with neurointensive care strategies continues to be a substantial difficulty facing the traumatic brain injury (TBI) research community. For patient-tailored case analysis, it remains challenging to establish how lesion profile modulates longitudinal changes in cortical structure and connectivity, as well as how these changes lead to behavioral, cognitive and neural dysfunction. Additionally, despite the clinical potential of morphometric and connectomic studies, few analytic tools are available for their study in TBI. Here we review the state of the art in structural and connectomic neuroimaging for the study of TBI and illustrate a set of recently-developed, patient-tailored approaches for the study of TBI-related brain atrophy and alterations in morphometry as well as interregional connectivity. The ability of such techniques to quantify how injury modulates longitudinal changes in cortical shape, structure and circuitry is highlighted. Quantitative approaches such as these can be used to assess and monitor the clinical condition and evolution of TBI victims, and can have substantial translational impact, especially when used in conjunction with measures of neuropsychological function.

Additional Material
1 File (190.482kB)
Irimia-JNeurosurgSci2014-fig2.jpg (190.482kB)