Surgical Planning Laboratory - Brigham & Women's Hospital - Boston, Massachusetts USA - a teaching affiliate of Harvard Medical School

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Auditory Feedback to Support Image-Guided Medical Needle Placement

Institution:
1Jacobs University, Bremen, Germany. david.black@mevis.fraunhofer.de.
2Faculty of Computer Science, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany.
3Surgical Planning Laboratory, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
Publisher:
Springer
Publication Date:
Sep-2017
Journal:
Int J Comput Assist Radiol Surg
Volume Number:
12
Issue Number:
9
Pages:
1655-63
Citation:
Int J Comput Assist Radiol Surg. 2017 Sep;12(9):1655-63.
PubMed ID:
28213646
PMCID:
PMC5561528
Keywords:
Auditory Display, Human-computer Interfaces, Image-guided Therapy, Needle Placement
Appears in Collections:
NAC, NCIGT, SPL
Sponsors:
P41 EB015902/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/United States
P41 EB015898/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/United States
Generated Citation:
Black D., Hettig J., Luz M., Hansen C., Kikinis R., Hahn H. Auditory Feedback to Support Image-Guided Medical Needle Placement. Int J Comput Assist Radiol Surg. 2017 Sep;12(9):1655-63. PMID: 28213646. PMCID: PMC5561528.
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PURPOSE: During medical needle placement using image-guided navigation systems, the clinician must concentrate on a screen. To reduce the clinician's visual reliance on the screen, this work proposes an auditory feedback method as a stand-alone method or to support visual feedback for placing the navigated medical instrument, in this case a needle. METHODS: An auditory synthesis model using pitch comparison and stereo panning parameter mapping was developed to augment or replace visual feedback for navigated needle placement. In contrast to existing approaches which augment but still require a visual display, this method allows view-free needle placement. An evaluation with 12 novice participants compared both auditory and combined audiovisual feedback against existing visual methods. RESULTS: Using combined audiovisual display, participants show similar task completion times and report similar subjective workload and accuracy while viewing the screen less compared to using the conventional visual method. The auditory feedback leads to higher task completion times and subjective workload compared to both combined and visual feedback. CONCLUSION: Audiovisual feedback shows promising results and establishes a basis for applying auditory feedback as a supplement to visual information to other navigated interventions, especially those for which viewing a patient is beneficial or necessary.