Surgical Planning Laboratory - Brigham & Women's Hospital - Boston, Massachusetts USA - a teaching affiliate of Harvard Medical School

Surgical Planning Laboratory

The Publication Database hosted by SPL

All Publications | Upload | Advanced Search | Gallery View | Download Statistics | Help | Import | Log in

Auditory Display as Feedback for a Novel Eye-tracking System for Sterile Operating Room Interaction

Institution:
1Medical Image Computing, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany. david.black@mevis.fraunhofer.de.
2Jacobs University, Bremen, Germany.
3Innovation Center Computer Assisted Surgery, Leipzig, Germany.
4Leipzig University of Applied Sciences, Leipzig, Germany.
Publisher:
Springer
Publication Date:
Jan-2018
Journal:
Int J Comput Assist Radiol Surg
Volume Number:
13
Issue Number:
1
Pages:
37-45
Citation:
Int J Comput Assist Radiol Surg. 2018 Jan;13(1):37-45.
PubMed ID:
29079993
PMCID:
PMC5772904
Keywords:
Interventional radiology, Machine learning, Magnetic resonance imaging, Motion compensation, Percutaneous needle insertion, Respiratory motion
Appears in Collections:
SPL
Sponsors:
U24 CA180918/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
P41 EB015902/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/United States
R01 EB014955/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/United States
P41 EB015898/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/United States
MT 2013-0043/Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation/United States
Generated Citation:
Black D., Unger M., Fischer N., Kikinis R., Hahn H., Neumuth T., Glaser B. Auditory Display as Feedback for a Novel Eye-tracking System for Sterile Operating Room Interaction. Int J Comput Assist Radiol Surg. 2018 Jan;13(1):37-45. PMID: 29079993. PMCID: PMC5772904.
Export citation:
Google Scholar: link

PURPOSE: The growing number of technical systems in the operating room has increased attention on developing touchless interaction methods for sterile conditions. However, touchless interaction paradigms lack the tactile feedback found in common input devices such as mice and keyboards. We propose a novel touchless eye-tracking interaction system with auditory display as a feedback method for completing typical operating room tasks. Auditory display provides feedback concerning the selected input into the eye-tracking system as well as a confirmation of the system response. METHODS: An eye-tracking system with a novel auditory display using both earcons and parameter-mapping sonification was developed to allow touchless interaction for six typical scrub nurse tasks. An evaluation with novice participants compared auditory display with visual display with respect to reaction time and a series of subjective measures. RESULTS: When using auditory display to substitute for the lost tactile feedback during eye-tracking interaction, participants exhibit reduced reaction time compared to using visual-only display. In addition, the auditory feedback led to lower subjective workload and higher usefulness and system acceptance ratings. CONCLUSION: Due to the absence of tactile feedback for eye-tracking and other touchless interaction methods, auditory display is shown to be a useful and necessary addition to new interaction concepts for the sterile operating room, reducing reaction times while improving subjective measures, including usefulness, user satisfaction, and cognitive workload.